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Why Do I Need A Guru?

 

The Bhagavad-gita presents the idea! teacher-student relationship. Faced with fighting a battle against his friends and relatives, Arjuna broke down. Therefore, he approached his guru, Lord Sri  Krishna who is accepted throughout the Vedas as the Supreme Person, the knower and compiler of the Vedas. Arjuna told Lord Krishna, "Now I am confused about my duty and have lost all  composure because of miserly weakness. In this condition lam asking You to tell me for certain what is best for me.Now I am Your disciple, and a soul surrendered unto You. Please instruct  me." (Bhagavad-gita 2.7).

 

By nature's design the complete system of material activities is a source of per­plexity for everyone. At every step there is perplexity and therefore it behooves one to approach a bona fide  spiritual master who can give one proper guidance for executing the purpose of life. All Vedic I iteratures "advise us to approach a bona fide spiritual master to get  free from the material rplexities  of life which happen without our desire They are like forest fire that somehow blazes without being set by anyone  Similarly the world situation is such that being perplexities of life automatically  appear, without our wanting such Confusion. No one wants fire to break out, and yet it does, and then we become perplexed. The Vedic wisdom therefore advises that in order to solve the  perplexities of life, one must approach a  spiritual master who is in diseiplic succession. Who is the man in perplexities? It is he who does not under­stand the problems of life: birth, old age,  disease and death. The kripana (miser) thinks that he is able to protect his family mem­bers from death; or thinks that his family or society can save him from the verge of death. Such family  attachment can be found even in the lower animals who take care of their children also. Being intelligent, Arjuna could understand that his material af­fection for the body of family members and  his wish to protect them from death were the causes of his perplexities.

 

Krishna wanted the Kurukshetra battle to take place as a part of His divine plan to

 

*Place King Yudhishtira on the throne

*Re-establish religion in the world

*Deliver Bhagavad-gita for the benefit of all humanity.

 

 Arjuna was a kshatriya. Although he could understand that his duty to fight was awaiting him, still, on account of miserly weakness, he could not discharge his duties. He therefore offered him  self   to Krishna, the supreme spiritual master, as a disciple.He wanted t0 Stop friendly talks. Talks between  the master and  the disciple are serious. Krishna is therefore the original spiritual  master of the science of the Bhagavad-gita and Arjuna is the first disciple for understanding the Gita.

 

After hearing the Bhagavad-gita from Lord Krishna Arjuna was freed from all illusion. He fought the war according to the instructions of Lord Krishna, won the kingdom of the entire world, and  finally went back to the kingdom of God at the end of his life. Thus the example of Arjuna shows that, in order to attain true success in life, one must take shelter of a bona fide spiritual master.  Therefore the Mundaka Upanishad (1.2.12) enjoins:

 

tad-vijnanartham sa gurum evabhigacchet

samit-panih srotriyam brahma-nistham

 

"In order to learn the transcendental science, one must submissively approach a bona fide spiritual master, who is coming in disciplic succession and is fixed in the Absolute Truth."

Why Do I Need A Guru?

 

The Bhagavad-gita presents the idea! teacher-student relationship. Faced with fighting a battle against his friends and relatives, Arjuna broke down. Therefore, he approached his guru, Lord Sri  Krishna who is accepted throughout the Vedas as the Supreme Person, the knower and compiler of the Vedas. Arjuna told Lord Krishna, "Now I am confused about my duty and have lost all  composure because of miserly weakness. In this condition lam asking You to tell me for certain what is best for me.Now I am Your disciple, and a soul surrendered unto You. Please instruct  me." (Bhagavad-gita 2.7).

 

By nature's design the complete system of material activities is a source of per­plexity for everyone. At every step there is perplexity and therefore it behooves one to approach a bona fide  spiritual master who can give one proper guidance for executing the purpose of life. All Vedic I iteratures "advise us to approach a bona fide spiritual master to get  free from the material rplexities  of life which happen without our desire They are like forest fire that somehow blazes without being set by anyone  Similarly the world situation is such that being perplexities of life automatically  appear, without our wanting such Confusion. No one wants fire to break out, and yet it does, and then we become perplexed. The Vedic wisdom therefore advises that in order to solve the  perplexities of life, one must approach a  spiritual master who is in diseiplic succession. Who is the man in perplexities? It is he who does not under­stand the problems of life: birth, old age,  disease and death. The kripana (miser) thinks that he is able to protect his family mem­bers from death; or thinks that his family or society can save him from the verge of death. Such family  attachment can be found even in the lower animals who take care of their children also. Being intelligent, Arjuna could understand that his material af­fection for the body of family members and  his wish to protect them from death were the causes of his perplexities.

 

Krishna wanted the Kurukshetra battle to take place as a part of His divine plan to

 

*Place King Yudhishtira on the throne

*Re-establish religion in the world

*Deliver Bhagavad-gita for the benefit of all humanity.

 

 Arjuna was a kshatriya. Although he could understand that his duty to fight was awaiting him, still, on account of miserly weakness, he could not discharge his duties. He therefore offered him  self   to Krishna, the supreme spiritual master, as a disciple.He wanted t0 Stop friendly talks. Talks between  the master and  the disciple are serious. Krishna is therefore the original spiritual  master of the science of the Bhagavad-gita and Arjuna is the first disciple for understanding the Gita.

 

After hearing the Bhagavad-gita from Lord Krishna Arjuna was freed from all illusion. He fought the war according to the instructions of Lord Krishna, won the kingdom of the entire world, and  finally went back to the kingdom of God at the end of his life. Thus the example of Arjuna shows that, in order to attain true success in life, one must take shelter of a bona fide spiritual master.  Therefore the Mundaka Upanishad (1.2.12) enjoins:

 

tad-vijnanartham sa gurum evabhigacchet

samit-panih srotriyam brahma-nistham

 

"In order to learn the transcendental science, one must submissively approach a bona fide spiritual master, who is coming in disciplic succession and is fixed in the Absolute Truth."